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Are you wondering how you can bring more authentic history into your workplace or education setting? With the Canada 150 celebrations coming to an end as 2018 begins, the Graphic History Collective is revisiting artistic initiatives created by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people last year in opposition to the controversial celebration. Remember Resist Redraw is a poster series established by the Graphic History Collective to tell stories of racism, colonialism, and inequality in Canadian history through beautiful and informative illustrations. “Instead of birthday cake and fireworks, we thought that our project during Canada 150 could serve almost as alternative Heritage Minutes, in poster form” said Sean Carleton, member of the Graphic History Collective. The poster series highlights historical events and people that are traditionally left out of the mainstream conversations about Canadian history, including the residential school era, the Battle of Batoche 1885, and the Idle No More movement.

Educators from across the country have adopted the posters, and the accompanying essays, and used them in their classrooms as educational tools for learning about Canadian history. Students in Scarborough, Ontario, where a poster about the mistreatment of Filipino migrants and caregivers was adopted into the curriculum, appreciated the inclusive-approach taken by educators through including events and people typically not mentioned in history classes. “It’s nice to hear something that I can relate to more,” one student said.

Seeing yourself reflected in history has been an important component of the Remember Resist Redraw projects for Jerry and Jesse Thistle, Cree-Métis creators of the poster titled When Canada Opened Fire on my Kokum Marianne with a Gatling Gun. Jesse says creating the illustration and essay has, “Given me a lot of pride in my family history, pride in my mom’s people, pride in myself”.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/entertainment/remember-resist-redraw-canada-150-history-1.4429262